City of Dubrovnik (Old Town)
450 meters from Villa

Dubrovnik (Latin: Ragusium)is a Croatian city on the Adriatic Sea, in the region of Dalmatia. It is one of the most prominent tourist destinations in the Mediterranean, a seaport and the centre of Dubrovnik-Neretva County. In 1979, the city of Dubrovnik joined the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.
The prosperity of the city of Dubrovnik was historically based on maritime trade. As the capital of the Republic of Ragusa, a maritime republic, the city achieved a high level of development, particularly during the 15th and 16th centuries. Dubrovnik became notable for its wealth and skilled diplomacy.

Fort Lovrijenac
400 meters from Villa

Fort Lovrijenac or St. Lawrence Fortress, often called "Dubrovnik's Gibraltar", is a fortress and theater located outside the western wall of the city of Dubrovnik in Croatia, 37 m above sea level.Famous for its plays and importance in resisting Venetian rule, it overshadows the two entrances to the city, from the sea and by land.

Stradun (street)
460 meters from Villa

Stradun (pronounced [strǎduːn]) or Placa (Stradone or Corso) is the main street of Dubrovnik, Croatia. The limestone-paved pedestrian street runs some 300 metres through the Old Town, the historic part of the city surrounded by the Walls of Dubrovnik. The site of the present-day street used to be a marshy channel which separated Ragusa from the forest settlement of Dubrava before it was reclaimed in the 13th century. Stradun stretches through the walled town in the east-west direction, connecting the western entrance called the "Pile Gate" to the "Ploče Gate" on the eastern end. Both ends are also marked with 15th-century fountains (the so-called Large Onofrio's Fountain in the western section and the Small Onofrio's Fountain on the east end) and bell towers (the Dubrovnik Bell Tower to the east end and the bell tower attached to the Franciscan monastery to the west)

Onofrio's Fountain
460 meters from Villa

Opposite the Church of Holy Salvation, next to the Pile Gates, is the magnificent fountain built by Onofrio della Cava. The fountain was greatly damaged in the earthquake and its beauty and functionality impaired. It was erected as a celebration of the completion of the new waterworks in 1438, which thus supplied the city with water from the Dubrovnik River, 12 kilometres away.

This fountain, with the beauty of its architecture and the gurgling of its clean water, was intended to preserve the memory of this significant technical and important feat. As a favourite meeting place for the city's youth, it entered into the decor, along with the Small Onofrio Fountain, in the Renaissance comedy "Novela od Stanca" by Marin Drzic, the greatest Dubrovnik comedy writer.

Rector's Palace
785 meters from Villa

Between the Town Hall and the Church of St. Blaise on one side and the Cathedral on the other side the Rector's Palace, an outstanding monument of secular architecture, is found.

The Rector's palace is a harmonious Gothic and Renaissance palace with certain Baroque additions. The palace owes its present shape to many additions and reconstructions throughout its turbulent history. From time to time it happened that the palace was destroyed or heavily damaged by either fires, gunpowder explosions or earthquakes which required a total or partial reconstruction or repair of the building. Each architect had it's own view of how the building should look so nowadays we can enjoy the unique mixture of styles blended perfectly across this monumental structure.

Ancient City Walls
450 meters from Villa

The Walls of Dubrovnik (Croatian: Dubrovačke gradske zidine) are a series of defensive stone walls that have surrounded and protected the citizens of the afterward proclaimed maritime city-state of Dubrovnik (Ragusa), situated in southern Croatia, since the city's founding prior to the 7th century as a Byzantium castrum on a rocky island named Laus (Ragusia or Lave).With numerous additions and modifications throughout their history, they have been considered to be amongst the great fortification systems of the Middle Ages, as they were never breached by a hostile army during this time period. In 1979, the old city of Dubrovnik, which includes a substantial portion of the old walls of Dubrovnik, joined the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.

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